timmyrotter
04-27-2007, 04:07 PM
this is something that has peaked my interest lately. what do you guys know about it? i dont know the first thing about so anything will help. do companies like Scottrade.com charge a portion for trading through them? can you buy stock directly through a company? is online trading the best way to go?

terrasin
04-27-2007, 08:33 PM
I'm still learning about buying stocks since I'm considering my choices for some very serious financial investing in the near future. Yahoo Finance has a great portfolio system on their site you can use, plus all the up to date information on http://finance.yahoo.com/. It really depends what kind of market you're looking at investing in.

CJ

Tromos
04-28-2007, 04:50 PM
*shrug*

It's mostly a scam. I suppose you could learn that basic of playing in the market in any college-level macro economic course. But you're not really going to make much money unless you have the money to invest. What's the point of buying 20 shares at $2.00 a share when the trade is gonna cost you $20 to make? Plus most of the online groups require you to keep a minimum balance. And you only get the low price per trade deals if you make a minimum number of trades a month - all initially at a higher cost.

In the end, like most things about the market, only those with large amounts of money to invest tend to reap meaningful rewards.

Personally, I think you're better off with a Roth IRA or a solid set of well-performing mutual funds through your trusted bank.

terrasin
04-28-2007, 09:35 PM
Yes because people who invested in Google and Microsoft didn't make much money. :P I still curse myself for not investing in Google when I had the chance.

The issue is learning about what you're investing in and being smart about your investments. Not just tossing money all around the market hoping to hit the jackpot. Learn about companies, look at their business goals, look at their estimate growth rates... there is good money to be made in stock if you use your brain.

CJ

timmyrotter
04-29-2007, 09:07 AM
tromos, that is what i needed to hear. is there a better way where a company doesnt charge you to buy and sell?
Cj, i have been looking at stocks for awhile. some one ive been eyeing are Ethanol and Nintendo stocks.

bob
04-29-2007, 08:31 PM
My Dad uses TD-Ameritrade because they don't use brokers. I plan to use them as well once I start to invest in a few years. The market is kind of crappy at the moment, so I'm going to keep my feet dry for the moment.

timmyrotter
04-29-2007, 08:39 PM
My Dad uses TD-Ameritrade because they don't use brokers. I plan to use them as well once I start to invest in a few years. The market is kind of crappy at the moment, so I'm going to keep my feet dry for the moment.

Dow Jones just hit a record high. do you consider that crappy?

bob
04-29-2007, 08:43 PM
What goes up, must come down. Don't invest in the market at the top.

timmyrotter
04-29-2007, 09:37 PM
oh yeah, i understand that it is crappy from a buying stand point. but its great if you have industry stocks.

terrasin
04-30-2007, 12:09 AM
tromos, that is what i needed to hear. is there a better way where a company doesnt charge you to buy and sell?
Cj, i have been looking at stocks for awhile. some one ive been eyeing are Ethanol and Nintendo stocks.
Meh, Nintendo's market will go down I think. A good time to get in would have been 2 years ago when they were just starting to talk about the new system (Wii) and selling about a month after release. That's not even mentioning that Nintendo stock is already high priced.

With Ethanol, I heard some interesting news today about it which makes me think twice about where to put money when investing in it. Personally, if I decide to put money on any ethanol products, I'll find a market for corn instead of ethanol directly. They expect corn prices to soar once the new plants are built because of demand for it. Plus, more farmers are going to move to growing corn instead of beans because it will be a smart money making move for them. This also means that there will be a shortage of soy beans which will open up a whole other market until the system balances itself out after a few years.

CJ